March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, 1963, in Washington, D.C. Photo by Warren K. Leffler, courtesy of the Library of Congress. A group of African-Americans carry protest signs in support of civil rights.

Freedom to Learn

The freedom to learn our nation’s history is under siege. In many states, legislators have introduced “divisive concepts” bills that seek to limit history education in ways that would make it virtually impossible for teachers to help students to thoughtfully consider slavery and racism in American historical development. Some of these proposals have already become law. While most of this legislation is aimed at public primary and secondary education, many also specifically include or have implications for public higher education.

The AHA’s Freedom to Learn initiative educates historians and others on how to advocate publicly for honest history education, responds directly to the bills themselves, and creates resources to help teachers directly affected by these bills think about how to maintain the integrity of their history courses.

The AHA has sent letters to legislators in the following states. To view all the letters and statements sent or co-signed by the AHA on national history education issues, visit our History Education Advocacy archive webpage.

Alabama

Alaska

Arizona

California

Florida

Georgia

Indiana

Kansas

Kentucky

Maryland

Missouri

Nebraska

Ohio

Oklahoma

South Carolina

South Dakota

Tennessee

Texas

West Virginia