History Education Advocacy

  • AHA Sends Letter of Concern about Missing Chinese Scholar (March 2024)

    The AHA has sent a letter to President Xi Jinping of the People’s Republic of China expressing “concern for the fate of Professor Rahile Dawut, a scholar of Uyghur studies who has apparently been sentenced to life in prison and whose specific whereabouts are unknown.” Professor Dawut, missing since 2018, has “been detained and sentenced in connection with her peaceful exercise of the right to academic freedom” in a situation that, in addition to raising concern for Dawut’s well-being, “raises questions about the ability of intellectuals in China generally to conduct scholarship safely and freely.” The AHA urges President Xi to secure Professor Dawut’s immediate and unconditional release.
  • Coalition of Organizations Submit Letter Opposing Florida SB 1372 (February 2024)

    The AHA, as part of a nonpartisan coalition of organizations, has signed on to a letter opposing Florida SB 1372, which would threaten the integrity of K–12 history education in the state. This statement expresses “serious concerns that the bill is not constitutionally viable, is overly vague, and is an example of viewpoint discrimination that is contrary to free speech and expression. . . . This bill could create a new generation of history teachers who are unsure how to teach material about slavery, the Civil Rights Movement, or women’s suffrage.”
  • AHA Sends Letter to South Carolina State University Opposing Plan to Cut Majors (February 2024)

    The AHA has sent a letter to leaders at South Carolina State University expressing grave concern about a plan to cut majors in history, African American studies, and social studies teaching at the university. “Cutting a core liberal arts degree like African American studies or history is short-sighted. Civic leaders from all corners of the political landscape have lamented the lack of historical knowledge of American citizens,” the AHA wrote. “Cutting social studies education is an especially irresponsible move at a moment when teachers are being prohibited from teaching the truth about slavery, the Civil Rights Movement, or the continuing centrality of racism in American public culture.”
  • AHA Sends Letter to Iowa House of Representatives Opposing Bill on K-12 Social Studies Curriculum

    The AHA has sent a letter to the members of the Iowa House of Representatives opposing HF 2544, a bill that “directly encroaches on the authority and expertise of the members of the Iowa State Board of Education, sidestepping statutory minimum requirements for the educational program and bypassing the state’s mandated process for developing social studies standards.” The proposed legislation, the AHA wrote, “is a Frankenstein’s monster constructed out of disembodied portions of five out-of-state model bills” that “leaves no room for input from teachers, administrators, historians, or parents.”
  • AHA Sends Letter to Florida Legislature Opposing Harmful K–12 Teacher Training Bill (February 2024)

    The AHA has sent a letter to Florida legislators opposing HB 1291/SB 1372, a “heavy-handed and inappropriate intervention in college curricula, classroom instruction, and professional learning.” The proposed legislation, the AHA writes, “would require educators teach a history that is incomplete, tendentious, and politically driven rather than based on evidence and consistent with professional standards. . . . SB 1372 establishes a mechanism for censoring classroom teaching and learning, and hence stands in stark opposition to academic freedom and true intellectual diversity.”
  • AHA Action Alert Opposing Florida Teacher Training Bill (February 2024)

    AHA Action Alert Opposing Florida Teacher Training Bill
  • AHA Letter to Indiana Legislature Opposing “Intellectual Diversity” Tenure Bill (February 2024)

    The AHA has sent a letter to members of the Indiana House Education Committee opposing Senate Bill 202, which would “create a policy for granting tenure and terminating the appointments of tenured faculty based on how well that faculty member has fostered ‘intellectual diversity’ within the classroom.” The bill, the AHA wrote, “inserts the will and judgment of politically appointed boards of trustees into the fundamental work of university faculty” and “would create conditions of uncertainty for faculty, presenting situations where their jobs are on the line for the infraction of not having enough arbitrarily decided ‘variety’ in their ‘political or ideological frameworks’ . . . mak[ing] it easier for public interest groups and politicians—of either party—to weed out faculty with whom they disagree.”
  • AHA Letter to Nebraska Legislature Opposing Bill to Eliminate Tenure (February 2024)

    The AHA has sent a letter to the Nebraska state legislature opposing LB 1064, a proposed bill that would eliminate tenure in state universities and colleges. “If passed [LB 1064] will severely diminish the ability of the state's public universities to recruit and retain the quality of faculty required for first-rate teaching and research,” the AHA wrote. “Any public university in the state would immediately become an employer of last choice among scholars who desire an environment amenable to high-quality teaching and research.“
  • AHA Letter Opposing Museum of the American Revolution’s Hosting of Moms for Liberty Event (June 2023)

    The AHA has sent a letter to the Museum of the American Revolution asking that the museum “reconsider its decision to rent event space to Moms for Liberty as part of that organization’s Joyful Warriors National Summit.” “Moms for Liberty has crossed a boundary in its attempts to silence and harass teachers, rather than participate in legitimate controversy. . . . [T]his isn’t about politics or different understandings of our nation’s past; it’s about an organization whose mission is to obstruct the professional responsibilities of historians,” the AHA wrote. “We encourage you to reconsider whether this organization should be granted the legitimacy of holding a major event at a museum with the reputation and professional standing of the Museum of the American Revolution.”
  • AHA Releases Statement Opposing Exclusion of LGBTQ+ History in Florida (May 2023)

    The AHA has released a statement condemning the Florida Department of Education (FLDOE)’s recent ruling banning educators from “provid[ing] classroom instruction to students in grades 4 through 12 on sexual orientation or gender identity unless such instruction is . . . expressly required by state academic standards.” “This erasure flattens the story of America’s long Civil Rights Movement… [and] bars students from examining cultures, religions, and societies—including Indigenous nations within Florida—that have embraced traditions of gender fluidity and homosexuality as meaningful categories of social identity and organization,” the AHA wrote. “We ask that the FLDOE reconsider its vague and destructive policy of censorship, and instead encourage the teaching of accurate and inclusive histories of the United States and the world.” To date, 51 organizations have signed on to the statement.
  • AHA Sends Letter to Alabama Senate Opposing “Divisive Concepts” Bill (May 2023)

    The AHA has sent a letter to the Alabama Senate opposing Senate Bill 247, which would “make it virtually impossible for history educators to help students thoughtfully consider the continuing impacts of slavery and racism in American history.” By requiring public schools, colleges, and universities to teach that slavery and racism are solely “deviations from, betrayals of, and failures to live up to the founding principles of the United States,” SB 247 “would therefore prohibit teachers from asking students to consider a diverse set of primary sources and wrestle with one of the central academic issues in historical scholarship for more than 50 years: the historical relationship between slavery and freedom. . . . If passed, this bill would result in ignorance of basic facts about American history and undermine the education of Alabama’s students, including their ability to perform effectively in advanced coursework, whether in high school or college.”
  • AHA Submits Testimony Opposing Ohio Learning Standards Legislation (May 2023)

    The AHA has submitted testimony to the Ohio House Primary and Secondary Education Committee expressing “grave concern” about House Bill 103, which would create a new, politically appointed task force to produce state social studies standards. The legislation, the AHA wrote, “would create an entirely new bureaucratic apparatus as a strategy for overruling an open, democratic, and professional process.” Additionally, HB 103 singles out the American Birthright model standards, which emphasize “content in place of critical thinking … focus[ing] narrowly on lessons about how students should feel about the United States,” as the basis for “a radical overhaul of history and social studies education in Ohio.
  • AHA Letter to North Carolina House of Representatives Opposing Bill to Eliminate Tenure (May 2023)

    The AHA has sent a letter to members of the North Carolina House of Representatives: the Education - Community Colleges Committee, and the Education - Universities Committee. The letter opposes HB 715, which would eliminate tenure for new hires at state universities beginning in July 2024. This, the AHA wrote, is “a short-sighted and ill-conceived policy that would significantly undercut what has been accomplished over decades by the thousands of individuals responsible for building a university system that ranks among the best in the world. . . . . Tenure helps to protect university classrooms and laboratories as spaces where learning is advanced and new knowledge is created, rather than any given political platform promoted.”
  • AHA Sends Letter to Florida Senate Opposing Restrictive Education Bill (May 2023)

    The AHA has sent a letter to the Florida Senate registering “strong objection” to SB 266, legislation which “proposes to allow the study of the past only through an exceedingly narrow and tendentious frame.” As an amended version of HB 999, about which the AHA “expressed horror” in March, “the new provisions would serve only to restrict the extent to which history faculty are allowed to introduce Florida students to non-Western civilizations. . . . [T]he bill’s repeated emphasis on teaching only a thin slice of history to all students in required courses would hobble students and deprive them of the chance to become global leaders.”
  • AHA Sends Letter to SFSU President Regarding “Investigation” of History Professor (April 2023)

    The AHA has sent a letter to San Francisco State University president Lynn Mahoney expressing “deep concern” regarding the university’s “investigation” of Professor Maziar Behrooz for showing a drawing of the prophet Muhammad in his course on the history of the Islamic world between 500 and 1700. “Sanctioning Professor Behrooz for showing an image relevant to the course on grounds that it offended a student would constitute a serious breach of the professor’s academic freedom,” the AHA wrote. “Any attempts to ban the teaching of primary sources on the grounds that they offend religious sensibilities would mean that SFSU would be taking a position on a theological matter—one that is well beyond the purview of institutions of higher education.”
  • AHA Letter to Texas House of Representatives Opposing Legislation to Eliminate Tenure (April 2023)

    The AHA has sent a letter to the members of the Texas House of Representatives opposing SB 18, which would eliminate tenure for new hires at public institutions in the state beginning in 2024. “Tenure helps to protect university classrooms and laboratories as spaces where learning is advanced and new knowledge is created, rather than any given political platform promoted,” the AHA wrote. “Were Texas to eliminate ‘tenure-track’ positions… any public university in Texas would immediately become an employer of last choice among scholars who desire an environment amenable to high-quality teaching and research.”
  • AHA Sends Letter to Ohio Senate Opposing Higher Education Bill (April 2023)

    The AHA has sent a letter to members of the Ohio Senate registering “strong objection” to Ohio Senate Bill 83, which would “undermine the integrity of education in Ohio’s public universities.” The level of state oversight described in the bill, the AHA wrote, “smacks less of guaranteeing the ideological diversity cited in the legislation than government surveillance more closely resembling the Soviet Union or Communist China than a public university system in the United States. . . . If passed, SB 83 would undermine the quality of public higher education in Ohio by preventing qualified instructors from teaching honest and accurate history.”
  • AHA Sends Letter Opposing Proposed South Dakota Social Studies Standards (April 2023)

    The AHA has sent a letter to the South Dakota Board of Education Standards registering strong concern that the social studies standards draft on the agenda for the Board of Education Standards’ April 17 meeting fails to satisfy the AHA’s Criteria for Standards in History/Social Studies/Social Sciences. “The document’s numerous flaws can be traced to a process that was rushed, secretive, and driven by political motives at the expense of the educational needs of South Dakota students,” the AHA wrote. “The AHA joins a clear majority of South Dakotans in its assessment of this unabashed attempt to interfere in K–12 social studies education.”
  • AHA Signs On to ACLS Statement Opposing Florida House Bill 999 (March 2023)

    The AHA has signed on to a statement from the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) opposing Florida House Bill 999, "protest[ing] this proposed legislation and call[ing] on citizens to recognize the danger it poses to higher education in this country." If HB 999 passes, the ACLS writes, "it ends academic freedom in the state's public colleges and universities, with dire consequences for their teaching, research, and financial well-being. . . . Academic freedom means freedom of thought, not the state-mandated production of histories edited to suit one party’s agenda in the current culture wars."
  • AHA Statement Opposing Florida House Bill 999 (March 2023)

    The AHA has released a statement on Florida House Bill 999, “express[ing] horror . . . at the assumptions that lie at the heart of this bill and its blatant and frontal attack on principles of academic freedom and shared governance central to higher education in the United States.” “What has previously best been characterized as unwarranted political intervention into public education has now escalated to an attempt at a hostile takeover of a state’s system of higher education,” the AHA writes. “This is not only about Florida. It is about the heart and soul of public higher education in the United States and about the role of history, historians, and historical thinking in the lives of the next generation of Americans.” To date, 84 organizations have signed onto the statement.
  • AHA Letter to Marymount University Opposing Proposed Elimination of History Major (February 2023)

    The AHA has sent a letter to Marymount University president Irma Becerra opposing the “short-sighted decision to propose to Marymount University’s governing board the elimination of history and other humanities majors” at the university. “We urge Marymount University to reconsider this decision, which undermines the university’s commitment to ‘intellectual curiosity, service to others, and a global perspective’,” the AHA wrote.
  • AHA Manager of Teaching and Learning Testifies before Virginia Board of Education (February 2023)

    On February 2, Brendan Gillis, manager of teaching and learning at the AHA, testified before the Virginia Board of Education's hearing on the history and social studies standards revisions process. He spoke in support of the collaborative Combined History and Social Science Standards for Virginia developed by the AHA, the Virginia Social Studies Leaders Consortium, and the Virginia Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Brendan reported on the AHA's involvement in Perspectives on History, "The Uncertain Future of Social Studies in Virginia." The AHA has also shared action alerts with VA members encouraging testimony and submitted comments on the draft standards.
  • AHA Letters Opposing Proposed Elimination of History Major at Marymount University (January 2023)

    The AHA has sent letters to Marymount University president Irma Becerra, provost Hesham El-Rewini, Faculty Council president Sarah Ficke, and Board of Trustees chair Edward Bersoff opposing the proposed elimination of the history major at the university. “The AHA has seen this approach to prioritization and restructuring before, and the results have been detrimental to students. . . . Overwhelming evidence shows that employers seek the kind of skills a history degree can provide,” the AHA wrote. “This elimination is an especially wrongheaded shift at a time when civic leaders from all corners of the political landscape have lamented the lack of historical knowledge of American citizens. Offering a history major is standard at comprehensive universities, and the elimination of the history major would place Marymount far outside the mainstream of its peer institutions.”
  • AHA Collaboration on Proposed Virginia History and Social Science Draft Standards (December 2022)

    The American Historical Association, the Virginia Social Studies Leaders Consortium, and the Virginia Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development “have collaborated to share their collective knowledge, experience, and expertise” to draft proposed history and social science standards for K–12 schools.
  • AHA Letter to South Dakota Board of Education Opposing Social Studies Standards Revision Process (September 2022)

    The AHA has sent a letter to the South Dakota Board of Education opposing its social studies standards revision process.
  • AHA Letter to Virginia Board of Education Urging Adoption of Proposed History Standards (October 2022)

    The American Historical Association has sent a letter to the Virginia Board of Education urging the board to proceed with adoption of the draft standards of learning for history and social science.
  • AHA Letter to Kansas Legislature Opposing Legislation Restricting History Education (March 2022)

    The AHA has sent a letter to the Kansas Senate Committee on Education opposing HB 515, which would restrict history education.
  • AHA Letter to Nebraska Legislature Opposing Legislation Restricting History Education (March 2022)

    The AHA has sent a letter to the Nebraska Government, Military, and Veterans Affairs Committee opposing LB 1077, which would restrict history education.
  • AHA Letters to Oklahoma Legislature Opposing Legislation Restricting History Education (March 2022)

    The AHA has sent letters to the Oklahoma House and Senate Education Committees and Senate Judiciary Committee opposing HB 2988, SB 1141, SB 803, and SB 1401, which would restrict history education.
  • AHA Letters to South Carolina Legislature Opposing Legislation Restricting History Education (March 2022)

    The AHA has sent letters to the South Carolina House Education and Public Works Committee and Senate Education Committee opposing H 4799, H 4605, H 4392, H 4343, H 4325, and SB 0982, which would restrict history education.
  • AHA Letters to Alaska Legislature Opposing Legislation Restricting History Education (March 2022)

    The AHA has sent letters to the Alaska House and Senate Education Committees opposing HB 228, HB 330, HB 343, HB 391, and SB 196, which would restrict history education.
  • AHA Letter to Ohio Legislature Opposing Legislation Restricting History Education (March 2022)

    The AHA has sent a letter to members of the Ohio House State and Local Government Committee opposing HB 327, which would restrict history education.
  • AHA Letters to Alabama Legislature Opposing Legislation Restricting History Education (March 2022)

    The AHA has sent letters to the Alabama House of Representatives and Senate opposing HB 312, HB 8, HB 9, and HB 11, as well as SB 292, SB 9, and SB 7, which would restrict history education.
  • AHA Letter to Maryland Legislature Opposing Legislation Restricting History Education (March 2022)

    The AHA has sent a letter to members of the Maryland House Ways and Means Committee opposing HB 1256, which would restrict history education.
  • AHA Letter to West Virginia Legislature Opposing Legislation Restricting History Education (March 2022)

    The AHA has sent a letter to members of the West Virginia House of Delegates opposing Senate Bills 498, 45, 182, 558, 587, and 618 and House Bills 4011, 4016, and 2595, which would restrict history education.
  • AHA Letters to Tennessee Legislature Opposing Legislation Restricting History Education (March 2022)

    The AHA has sent letters to the Tennessee House of Representatives and Senate opposing HB 2670 and SB 2290, which would restrict history education.
  • AHA Letter to Kentucky Legislature Legislature Opposing Legislation Restricting History Education (March 2022)

    The AHA has sent a letter to the Kentucky House of Representatives and Senate opposing SB 138, HB 14, and HB 18 , which would restrict history education.
  • AHA Letter to Indiana Legislature Opposing Legislation Restricting History Education (February 2022)

    The AHA has sent a letter to members of the Indiana Senate opposing HB 1134, which would restrict history education.
  • AHA Letters to Arizona Legislature Opposing Legislation Restricting History Education (February 2022)

    The AHA has sent letters to the Arizona House of Representatives and Senate opposing HB 2112 and HB 2291, which would restrict history education.
  • AHA Letter to Missouri Legislature Opposing Legislation Restricting History Education (February 2022)

    The AHA has sent a letter to the Missouri House Elementary and Secondary Education Committee opposing the following House Bills before the committee: HB 1457, HB 1474, HB 1484, HB 1554, HB 1634, HB 1669, HB 1767, HB 1815, HB 1835, HB 2132, HB 2189, and HB 2428.
  • AHA Letters to Florida Legislature Opposing Legislation Restricting History Education (February 2022)

    The AHA has sent letters to the Florida House of Representatives and Senate opposing HB 7, HB 57, and HB 1557 and SB 148, SB 242, and SB 1834, which would restrict history education.
  • AHA Letters to Georgia Legislature Opposing Legislation Restricting History Education (February 2022)

    The AHA has sent letters to the Georgia House of Representatives Education Committee and Senate Committee on Education and Youth opposing HB 1084 and SB 377, which would restrict history education.
  • AHA Letters to South Dakota Legislature Opposing Legislation Restricting History Education (February 2022)

    The AHA has sent letters to the South Dakota House of Representatives and Senate opposing HB 1337 and HB 1012, which would restrict history education.
  • AHA Letter Opposing Placentia-Yorba Linda Unified School District Resolution (January 2022)

    The AHA sent a letter to leaders at the Placentia-Yorba Linda Unified School District opposing the proposed Resolution No. 21-12, “Resolution Opposing the Teaching of Critical Race Theory.” “If the district is committed to academic freedom,” the AHA writes, “why has it singled out one set of ideas—critical race theory—as a subject that cannot be taught in Placentia-Yorba Linda schools?” The AHA hopes history teachers will not be required to minimize historical transgressions or their influence on the evolution of American institutions. “To do so would be a direct and clear violation of ‘the commitment to teach a complete and accurate account of history.’” The letter includes a statement criticizing similar legislative efforts to restrict education about racism in American history, co-authored by the AHA in June 2021 and signed by 152 organizations.
  • AHA Letter Opposing Oklahoma Bill That Would Limit Teaching of Race and Slavery in America (December 2021)

    The AHA has sent a letter to members of the Oklahoma state legislature strongly opposing House Bill 2988, which would restrict the teaching of “certain concepts pertaining to America and slavery.” This “irresponsible legislation,” the AHA writes, would be “harmful to the youth of Oklahoma, leaving students ignorant of basic facts of American history and poorly prepared for the critical thinking and interpretive skills required for career and civic accomplishment.“
  • AHA Letter Opposing Proposed Legislation on History Education in Texas (August 2021)

    The AHA wrote to Texas governor Greg Abbott and the members of the state legislature to oppose SB 3 and HB 28, introduced during the Texas legislature’s special session. “This proposed legislation threatens the integrity of history education in Texas,” the AHA wrote. The AHA “urges the Texas legislature to reject these bills, both of which seek to indoctrinate students rather than help them learn the inquiry-based skills that will prepare them for their future civic and professional lives.” The letter cited a previous AHA letter to Governor Abbott and the Texas Senate in May, an AHA statement in July, and a joint statement in June addressing similar legislative efforts that “risk infringing on the right of faculty to teach and of students to learn.”
  • AHA Letter Objecting to Social Studies Curriculum Legislation in Ohio (July 2021)

    The AHA has issued a letter to Gov. Mike DeWine and the members of the Ohio state legislature registering “strong objection to Ohio HB 322 and HB 327, acts relating to the social studies curriculum in public schools.” These bills, wrote the AHA, are “a tangle of contradictory mandates” about how history can be taught and “part of a misguided, nationally coordinated attempt to put the government in classrooms at every level from kindergarten through high school—and in the case of HB 327, through higher education—to intimidate teachers, and to indoctrinate students rather than helping them learn the inquiry-based skills that will prepare them for their future civic and professional lives.”
  • AHA Statement on Threats to Historical Integrity in Texas (July 2021)

    In a statement on the recently-enacted Texas House Bill 3979, the American Historical Association “views with alarm several provisions” in the so-called “divisive concepts” legislation, including those affecting state institutions that present history to the public. “By hindering the professional development of public historians and restricting funding,” the AHA’s statement says, “this law would prevent state-owned agencies and facilities from presenting accurate views of Texas history, and would hobble fundraising efforts crucial to the vibrant state-sponsored public-history sector.“ The legislation “clearly violates” the AHA’s Standards for Museum Exhibits Dealing with Historical Subjects and “will adversely affect not only K–12 students, but all Texans and visitors who want to learn more about the state’s complicated past.” 28 organizations have signed onto this statement to date.
  • Joint Statement on Legislative Efforts to Restrict Education about Racism in American History (June 2021)

    The American Association of University Professors, the American Historical Association, the Association of American Colleges & Universities, and PEN America have authored a joint statement stating their “firm opposition” to legislation, introduced in at least 20 states, that would restrict the discussion of “divisive concepts” in public education institutions. In total, 155 organizations have signed onto the statement.
  • AHA Statement on LGBTQ+ History Curriculum (May 2021)

    In response to recent legislative efforts and existing anti-LGBTQ+ laws in several states, the AHA has released a statement opposing “efforts to restrict the teaching of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer history in elementary, middle, and high schools.” “The failure to teach LGBTQ+ history,” the statement argues, “distorts the historical record, harms LGBTQ+ students specifically, and prevents all students from receiving a complete education.” The AHA supports “expanding access to LGBTQ+-inclusive history curricula and greater protections for history teachers who include LGBTQ+ history in their classrooms.”
  • National Coalition for History Issues Statement Opposing “Divisive Concepts” Legislation (May 2021)

    The National Coalition for History (NCH) has released a statement opposing the passage of so-called “divisive concepts” legislation currently under consideration in numerous state legislatures. NCH “deplores the intent of these bills to foment confusion and have a chilling effect on teachers,” the statement said. “We denounce such bills as thinly veiled attempts to place limits on a curriculum which fosters a comprehensive and critical look at our history from a variety of perspectives.” The NCH provides leadership in history-related advocacy. The AHA is a member of the Coalition, and AHA representatives serve on its executive committee.
  • AHA Letter Objecting to Texas House Bill 3979 (May 2021)

    The AHA has written a letter to Texas Lt. Governor Dan Patrick and the members of the Texas Senate registering strong objection to Texas House Bill 3979, urging them to “reject this misguided, harmful, and unnecessary piece of legislation.” The letter describes how the bill would likely endanger Advanced Placement and dual-enrollment programs in Texas public schools. “The actual purpose” of the bill, the AHA writes, “is about whitewashing American history, keeping to the margins (or excluding altogether) such central issues as slavery; forced removals of Native Americans; inequalities based on race, gender, or other characteristics; and other aspects of our past likely to inspire the vigorous discussion that characterizes a good history class. . . . To deny Texas students the opportunity to discuss these issues openly and freely is to deny them their rightful place as citizens of the United States, and of the world.”
  • AHA Signs On to MESA Statement on Florida Bill (May 2021)

    The AHA has signed on to a Middle East Studies Association statement opposing a Florida bill (HB233), approved by both houses and awaiting the governor’s signature, that would allow “students to record in classrooms without the consent of their professors.” The bill would also mandate “the State Board of Education and the Board of Governors to conduct an assessment of the ‘intellectual freedom and viewpoint diversity’ at every institution in the Florida College System.” The statement notes that the proposed law “constitutes a legislative intrusion that will have a chilling effect on the free exchange of opinions it claims to enhance” and would limit “students’ abilities to express their views freely in an open environment.”
  • AHA Statement Condemning Report of Advisory 1776 Commission (January 2021)

    The AHA has issued a statement condemning the report from "The President’s Advisory 1776 Commission.” “Written hastily in one month after two desultory and tendentious ‘hearings,’” the AHA writes, “without any consultation with professional historians of the United States, the report fails to engage a rich and vibrant body of scholarship that has evolved over the last seven decades.” 47 organizations have signed onto the statement.