2022 AHA Election: Committees

Committee on Committees

The Committee on Committees nominates individuals to fill vacancies on all regular Association committees. Returning members are Leo J. Garofalo, Connecticut Coll. (associate professor and chair; colonial Andean cities and markets, Afro-Iberians and African diaspora); Julie Hardwick, Univ. of Texas at Austin (early modern Europe, social/legal/gender); and Franziska Seraphim, Boston Coll. (modern Japan, global and comparative, historical memory, social politics).

Rashauna Johnson

University of Chicago (associate professor; Atlantic slavery and emancipation, 19th-century African diaspora, US South, urban and regional)

Website | Curriculum Vitae

Candidate Statement

I am a historian of Atlantic slavery and emancipation with a focus on the 19th-century US South. Drawing on archival research, theoretical works, and diverse literatures, my scholarship reflects my commitment to the discipline of history as well as its intersections with interdisciplinary conversations. My research interests also structure my teaching interests, which are rooted in an experiential and active approach to the study of the African diaspora. I am also deeply committed to using my scholarship as an avenue for civic engagement—particularly when it allows me to use my academic expertise in support of marginalized groups in society. I regularly volunteer in K–12 schools, community organizations, and civic efforts. I hope to bring these commitments to the Nominating Committee, where my priorities would be to advance ongoing efforts around diversity broadly defined and collaboration across branches within the AHA and beyond.

Caitlin Rosenthal

University of California, Berkeley (associate professor; political economy of slavery, US social and economic)

Website | Curriculum Vitae

Candidate Statement

I am a historian of US business and economic history. My first book, Accounting for Slavery, explored the development of business practices on slave plantations, seeking to illuminate the harrowing ways plantations blended quantification and violence. More broadly, I study the role of numbers in history—both as a subject for research and also as a method of analysis. As a member of the Committee on Committees, my goal would be to nominate historians who reflect the full diversity of our profession. The term “diversity” can be vague. More specifically, I would seek to prioritize: nominating scholars from underrepresented groups, including faculty of color and LGBTQ+ faculty; embracing career diversity, including scholars representing the broad range of institutions that employ history PhDs, both with and beyond the academy; and supporting breadth of methodology, including historians who employ a variety methods and study different geographies and time periods. I have previously served on multiple committees for the Business History Conference and the Economic History Association, including the Liaison Committees of both organizations. Before beginning my career as a historian, I worked as a consultant, and in my current teaching and mentoring I have supported doctoral students as they have transitioned into a broad range of career paths.

Nominating Committee

The Nominating Committee makes nominations for all elective posts in the AHA, oversees the counting of ballots, and reports the results of the election to the membership. Returning members are Amy M. Froide, Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore County (professor and chair; female investors and single women, Britain 1500-1800); Beatrice Gurwitz, National Humanities Alliance (deputy director; Latin American/Jewish history, higher education policy, public humanities); Lisa Leff, US Holocaust Memorial Museum and American Univ. (Jews of modern France); Sharlene Sinegal-DeCuir, Xavier Univ. of Louisiana (associate professor; African American, New Orleans); Melissa N. Stuckey, Elizabeth City State Univ. (African American migration to Oklahoma, African American history, Black freedom struggles); and Philip Thai, Northeastern Univ. (modern China, legal, economic, diplomatic).

Slot 1

Carlos Kevin Blanton

Texas A&M University (professor; Chicana/o history, education, civil rights, Texas)

Website | Curriculum Vitae

Candidate Statement

I study Chicana/o history. My work is situated within 20th-century US history, education history, civil rights history, and Texas history. I am currently working on a long intellectual history of the structure of racial discrimination against Mexican-origin people. I am also the head of a large R1 history department. I have directly benefitted from the professional development provided by the AHA as a scholar and now as a basement-level administrator. I appreciate the AHA’s crucial role in fostering the development of professional standards, leadership training, and a healthy climate for intellectual exploration. Representation is important and I will support the AHA’s continued efforts to involve historians from varied contexts ranging from work to training to demographics to region in its vital work. Maintaining such representation will best support the AHA’s continued advocacy of the study of the past as an essential part of a strong public discourse.

Marcus Nevius

University of Rhode Island (associate professor; African Americans/slave resistance/slavery-based economies/abolition during the Age of Revolutions)

Website | Curriculum Vitae

Candidate Statement

I am an associate professor of history and Africana Studies at the University of Rhode Island. A New Jerseyan by birth, I studied at a historically black college (HBCU), North Carolina Central University, and at the Ohio State University. I am the author of City of Refuge: Slavery and Petit Marronage in the Great Dismal Swamp, 1763–1856 (UGA, 2020). I have published historiographical articles in History Compass and in the William and Mary Quarterly, and several book reviews in the Journal of African American History, the Journal of Southern History, and H-Net Civil War. I am keenly interested in amplifying and promoting scholarship that contributes to new historical perspectives. If elected, I would be honored join the Nominating Committee's centrally important efforts to invite nominations from a diverse range of scholars at all ranks, and at different institutions, such that the AHA membership remains robust and current in the 21st century.

Slot 2

Elisabeth McMahon

Tulane University (associate professor; African slavery/emancipation/development, histories of gender and emotion in East Africa)

Website | Curriculum Vitae

Candidate Statement

I am a historian of East Africa, with numerous topical interests including histories of development, slavery, emancipation, and emotions along with the work of public history and digital humanities in Africa more broadly. A seismic shift has happened in the historical profession in the past two decades, around issues of representation and recruitment and the precarity many members of the profession face with shrinking tenure line positions. As a member of the nominating committee, I will seek to have the widest range of voices on AHA committees.

Bianca Murillo

California State University, Dominguez Hills (professor; modern Africa, global capitalism/economies/markets, race and gender studies)

Website | Curriculum Vitae

Candidate Statement

I am a historian of modern Africa, with research and teaching interests in global economies, decolonization, and race and gender studies. While my work focuses on 20th-century Ghana, my research on international business and capitalism is comparative and transnational. I am a teacher-scholar with experience at both private and public universities and have developed curriculum for college pipeline programs and public high schools. I have a range of service experience from the President’s Council for Diversity and Inclusion to chair of the Faculty Research Grants Committee. I am also committed to mentoring historically underrepresented and first-generation students, as well as junior faculty. I have led workshops on demystifying the college experience and have served for four years on the selection committee for the Woodrow Wilson Foundation Junior Faculty Career Enhancement Fellowship. I will bring my commitments to diversity, equity, and access to the AHA and the Nominating Committee.

Slot 3

Mou Banerjee

University of Wisconsin–Madison (assistant professor; modern South Asia, politics of religion in colonial India)

Website | Curriculum Vitae

Candidate Statement

I am a historian of modern South Asia, a woman of color, and an immigrant in the United States. My experience and background inform my identity and my philosophy as an academic. My research interests include religion and politics in India, the history of nonviolence activism, and the history of borders and immigration. My interdisciplinary approach was developed with the support of a range of scholars from diverse backgrounds, many of whom are members of the AHA. Therefore, my work is informed by my belief that the AHA provides us a space where underrepresented, underserved, and marginalized voices in our community can find clear expression and warm acceptance. As a member of the AHA’s Nominating Committee, I will prioritize creating compassionate, collaborative, and mentoring relationships with my colleagues and students across our discipline, to promote and amplify this vision. I am actively committed to improving and sustaining the AHA’s institutional outreach practices that create such inclusive and equitable intellectual environments.

Kaya Şahin

Indiana University (associate professor; early modern Ottoman Empire, history writing, governance, religious/confessional identity, ceremonies and rituals)

Website | Curriculum Vitae

Candidate Statement

I am a historian of the Ottoman Empire in the late medieval and early modern periods. I study the Ottomans within a global environment that was defined by imperial rivalry, commercialization, cultural exchanges, religious controversy, violent warfare, and ecological and demographic change. In recognition of my work in bringing together early modern Islamic and European histories, I was elected as the first Islamic history discipline representative at the Renaissance Society of America. In this position, since 2014, I organized panels with the participation of scholars from different fields, and I promoted the publication of articles and the review of works pertaining to Islamic history. As a member of the Committee on Committees under the AHA between 2016 and 2019, I strove to increase the representation of colleagues from historically marginalized and non-traditional backgrounds in all AHA committees. I aim to offer these experiences to the service of the Nominating Committee.