News & Advocacy

News

The latest activity of the AHA and historians in supporting history and historical thinking.

  • AHA Issues Statement Condemning Polish Law that Criminalizes Public Discussion of Polish Complicity in Nazi War Crimes

    Feb 09, 2018 - 

    The AHA issued a statement condemning legislation recently passed by the Polish government criminalizing public discussion of Polish participation in violence against Jews during World War II.  This legislation threatens free pursuit of historical inquiry and is therefore contrary to the international norms of academic freedom. According to the statement, "the AHA's stance is consistent with its longstanding objection to any and all previous efforts by the Polish government or any party to stifle speech and to restrict the content of scholarship concerned with Poland's role in the Holocaust and related war crimes."

  • AHA Signs Letter from NCH Regarding National Park System Advisory Board

    Feb 07, 2018 - 

    In January 2018 nearly all of the National Park System Advisory Board, the citizen panel that advises on National Park Service issues, resigned in frustration after Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke ignored repeated requests to hold meetings. The American Historical Association has endorsed a recent letter from the National Coalition for History to Secretary Zinke objecting to his refusal to engage with the board and calling for its reconstitution and the resumption of regular meetings. Visit the NCH's website for the full story.

  • AHA Member Receives Anneliese Maier Research Award

    Jan 31, 2018 - 

    Alan Mikhail, AHA member and professor of Ottoman history at Yale University, was one of this year's eight recipients of the Anneliese Maier Research Award, which is granted by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation to outstanding humanities scholars and social scientists nominated by collaborative partners at German universities and research institutions.  Each award is valued at €250,000. To see the Humboldt Foundation's full press briefing, visit the website

  • AHR Essay on Increasing Journal Diversity

    Jan 26, 2018 - 

    In an advance essay from the February issue, American Historical Review editor Alex Lichtenstein outlines plans to encourage greater diversity in the journal's content. A few proposed changes include an expansion of the Board of Editors, the nomination of new associate review editors, and a modification of the selection process for book reviewers. The full article is open to all readers. Learn more about the AHR on its website.

  • AHA Member Passes Away at 107

    Jan 23, 2018 - 

    John Douglas Forbes, founding professor in the University of Virginia's Darden School of Business and AHA member since 1943, passed away last Friday at age 107. He was the AHA's oldest member. Before his tenure at Darden, Forbes served as a curator for paintings at the San Francisco World's Fair (1938-40) and taught history at Wabash College, Bennington College, and several other liberal arts schools. To read the full In Memoriam, please visit the University of Virginia's website. 

  • AHA Members Receive over $1 Million in NEH Funding

    Jan 18, 2018 - 

    In December, the National Endowment for the Humanities granted over $12.75 million in funding to support more than 250 humanities projects. Twenty-five AHA members were among the recipients, and their grants total about $1.2 million. Find the full list of NEH grant recipients online.

  • AHA Urges Members to Contact Commerce Secretary Regarding Citizenship Question in 2020 Census

    Jan 10, 2018 - 

    The Department of Justice recently sent a letter to the Census Bureau requesting that a citizenship question be added to the 2020 Census. Future generations of historians will rely on this census for accurate and comprehensive data. According to our colleagues in the American Sociological Association, if such a question were to be included, "the integrity of the 2020 Census data will be fundamentally compromised. Including a citizenship question is likely to keep some people from responding to the questionnaire and others from responding truthfully, thereby undermining the accuracy of the data." The AHA urges members to contact Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross to register their concern by using the National Humanities Alliance advocacy tool.

  • Act Now to Protect Graduate Education

    Dec 04, 2017 - 

    Early Saturday morning, the Senate passed the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. Because the House of Representatives passed its tax bill on November 16, the House and Senate will now designate members for a conference committee to reconcile the two versions of the bill.

    As the AHA has previously reported, the House bill contains a provision that would make tuition waivers for graduate students subject to income tax, significantly increasing the tax liability of hundreds of thousands of graduate students. The Senate bill does not include that provision.

    We ask AHA members to urge the conference committee to reject the House provision in the final legislation.

    Please click here to contact your representative and encourage others to do so via social media. We have activated patch-thru calling in addition to automated email messages.

    The AHA asked members to contact House members during the debate in that chamber. We did not ask you to contact senators because this issue was not under consideration by the Senate. But now is the time.

    Conferees might be announced as early as today. Once they are, we will let you know who they are as soon as possible and reach out to our advocates in those key districts and states. Please stay tuned!

    We will continue to keep you updated as the bill progresses. Thank you for your support.

    Click here to call or write your Members of Congress now.
    Sincerely,
    James Grossman, AHA Executive Director

  • AHA Member Advises Caution and a Long Memory in Dealings with Iran

    Dec 01, 2017 - 

    Jane Dailey, professor of history at the University of Chicago and AHA member, wrote a Huffington Post op-ed about the history of American military involvement in the Middle East. In response to increased tensions with Iran, the Trump administration is quietly contemplating the possibility of preemptive military intervention, an idea that Dailey argues has been proven to be a mistake. Her piece advises Americans to learn from the Bush administration's mistakes in Iraq, which she characterizes as a "catastrophically flawed" engagement initiated by a preemptive US assault following 9/11. As Dailey writes, "these claims of existential threat and alliance between a Middle Eastern sovereign state and Al Qaeda are familiar. Before we turn our sights on Iran, we owe it to our children and to the veterans we celebrate every day to recall what happened the last time the United States went down this path."

  • National Trust for Historic Preservation Call to Action

    Dec 01, 2017 - 

    The federal Historic Tax Credit (HTC) was eliminated in the tax reform bill passed by the House of Representatives on November 16. The current Senate version of the tax bill keeps the HTC at the current 20% level, but make changes that reduce the value of this important (and successful) historic preservation incentive. The National Park Service website explains how the tax credit works.

    The legislative process is not over.   A House-Senate conference committee will reconcile the differences between the tax bills passed by each chamber. Our colleagues at the National Trust for Historic Preservation have provided a link to their online advocacy site to enable our members to send messages to Members of Congress in support of the Historic Tax Credit.