We have two recent article award winners who were published in our journal recently. Marjoleine Kars won the Coordinating Council for Women in History's 2017 Carol Gold Best Article Award for her article, "Dodging Rebellion: Politics and Gender in the Berbice Slave Uprising of 1763," which was published in the February 2016 issue of the American Historical Review. And Tehila Sasson won the 2017 Bernath Scholarly Article Prize from the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations for her article, "Milking the Third World: Humanitarianism, Capitalism, and the Moral Economy of the Nestlé Boycott," which was published in our October 2016 issue. Help us congratulate Kars and Sasson! 

October 2017 Issue

Latest Issue: October 2017 - Vol. 122, No. 4

In This Issue

No, the October 2017 issue does not have an article on the Russian Revolution of October 1917. Nevertheless, on the 100th anniversary of the Bolshevik Revolution, the Editor's "In Back Issues" column explores how this central event of the twentieth century has been treated over the years in the pages of the American Historical Review. That essay is followed by five full-length articles, three featured reviews, and our regular book review section. Read more...

In Back Issues

"Few would today," wrote Isaiah Berlin in a review essay in the AHR's October 1949 issue, "wish to deny that the Russian Revolution has, whether by attraction or repulsion, more than any other single cause transformed the social and political outlook of our time." Nevertheless, Berlin complained that despite the wide accessibility of documentary material, "more than thirty years after its occurrence so little sustained effort should have been made by Western historians to elucidate or even to construct in detail a factual account of the circumstances which led to this great historical upheaval." Nearly seventy years later, if Berlin's opening sentence remains as compelling as ever, this charge could not be further from the truth, as the historical profession has generated dozens, if not hundreds, of detailed, sophisticated histories of nearly every aspect of 1917, written from a wide variety of political perspectives. On this centenary of the October Revolution, I thought it worth examining the extent to which the AHR has participated in this historiographical transformation. Oddly enough, despite the signal importance of the October Revolution to the history of the previous century, the AHR has published only a few full-length articles on the topic over the years. Yet that does not mean these events have been absent from the journal's purview.  Read more... 

AHR Articles

"The Problem of Imperial Relatives in Early Modern Empires and the Making of Qing China," by Macabe Keliher

"Slavery, Sovereignty, and "Inheritable Blood": Reconsidering John Locke and the Origins of American Slavery," by Holly Brewer

"On the Origin of Theories: Charles Darwin's Vocabulary of Method," by Henry M. Cowles

"How to Break a State: The Habsburg Monarchy's Internal War, 1914-1918," by John Deak, Jonathan E. Gumz

"American Danger: United States Empire, Eurafrica, and the Territorialization of Industrial Capitalism, 1870-1950" by Sven Beckert

AHR Interview

AHR Interview with Sven BeckertListen to this pilot episode of AHR Interview, with AHR author Sven Beckert on his article, "American Danger."

Published on behalf of

American Historical Association logo

The AHA is the largest professional organization devoted to the discipline of history in all fields. Membership dues support the publication of the AHR. Join today!


Other AHA Publications

Perspectives on History logo

For the past 50 years, Perspectives on History has been the principal source for news and information about the historical discipline. Published monthly during the academic year, Perspectives on History offers articles and commentary on teaching, computers and software, history in the media, museum exhibitions, and archives and research. Also includes the most comprehensive current listings of employment openings and historical activities, both within and outside academia.  View publication

AHA Today logo

A blog focused on the latest happenings in the broad discipline of history and the professional practice of the craft that draws on the staff, research, and activities of the American Historical Association. View publication