Annual Meeting

Annual Meeting Highlights: January 6-9, 1994, San Francisco

AHA Staff, November 1993

The 108th Annual Meeting of the American Historical Association will be held in San Francisco at the San Francisco Hilton and the Parc Fifty Five hotels. Over 725 scholars, including seventy-seven from abroad, will appear on the program. In addition, thirty-seven affiliated societies will cosponsor sessions or hold separate luncheons, sessions, and meetings. These events are listed in the front portion of the Program, beginning on page 15. Program Committee chair Linda Levy Peck and cochair Stanley Engerman, both of the University of Rochester, noted, "Our aim was to attract papers that would reflect the large range of interests of today's historians and deal with the varieties of questions, methods, evidence, and interpretations that they address. We feel the program for 1994 demonstrates the richness of contemporary historical studies and offers diverse sessions that range from late antiquity to the current day." Highlighted below are just a few of the 144 AHA sessions. Members should consult the Program for a complete listing, beginning on page 47.

For the plenary session, scheduled for January 6 at 7:30 p.m., the Program Committee wished to address the important issue of the transformation of societies in the aftermath of revolutions, a topic of even greater relevance than when they began planning the program nearly one year ago. The session, "In the Aftermath of Revolution: 1790s, 1950s, and 1990s," includes as participants Joyce Appleby, University of California, Los Angeles; John Coatsworth, Harvard University; Achille Mbembe, University of Pennsylvania; and Isser Woloch, Columbia University. The committee is especially pleased that Bronislaw Geremek, the distinguished Polish medievalist and leader of Solidarity, will also take part. In addition, a number of sessions are devoted to pedagogy, the role of the historical journal, and defining the national interest, a topic of immediate concern this fall.

Several sessions focus on teaching, including "The Art and Skill of Teaching History at the Two-Year Institution"; "Tapping the National Storehouses: Primary Sources in the Classroom from the National Archives, the National Geographic Society, and the Smithsonian Institution"; "Matters of Content: Innovative Paradigms for Teaching the World History Survey Course"; "Beyond the Printed Page: Writing and Teaching History in a Digital Era"; "Teaching History in Collaboration with Foreign Language Teachers: Two Case Studies in Spanish"; "National Assessment and Standards in History: Perspectives on the Controversy"; "Re-forming the History Major: Fashioning Strategies to Extend the AHA/AAC Project on Liberal Learning and the History Major"; "The Teaching Portfolio"; and "Teaching World History in the Social Studies Curriculum." For a listing of sessions and activities related to history teaching, please consult the special section beginning on page 13 of the Program.

For the third year, the AHA Professional Division and the CCWHP/CGWH will continue their sponsorship of a workshop, "Interviewing in the Job Market of the 1990s." Session attendees will be divided into small interviewee groups, each led by a college or university faculty member or a public historian who will conduct mock interviews and lead discussion of successful interview strategies. The Professional Division will also sponsor the session, "Academic Larceny: Plagiarism, Misuse, and Derivation in Historical Scholarship," chaired by Drew Gilpin Faust, University of Pennsylvania and vice president of the division. Laurin A. Wollan, Jr., Florida State University, will deliver a lecture entitled, "On the Necessity and Sufficiency of Attribution: Notes Toward the Definition of Plagiarism in Scholarship." Comment will be provided by Paul Conkin, Vanderbilt University and member of the division, and Jon Kukla of the Historic New Orleans Collection.

The AHA's Research Division will sponsor "Book Reviewing and Scholarly Communication." Chaired by Michael J. Moore, Albion, panelists are William V. Bishel, American Historical Review; Casey N. Blake, Journal of American History; Christopher Johnson, Oxford University Press; Clara Lovett, American Association for Higher Education; and Helen MacLam, Choice magazine.

The Committee on Women Historians is sponsoring "Graduate Research in Black Women's History" with papers by Adele Logan Alexander, Howard University; Patricia Schecter, Princeton University; Angela Brown, Stanford University; and Channa K. Lee, University of California, Los Angeles. Kevin K. Gaines, Princeton University, will chair. The Committee on Minority Historians is sponsoring "Historical Documentaries of American Diversity" during the afternoon session on Saturday, January 8. Discussion will focus on three films which will be shown preceding the session, beginning at 1:00 p.m.: Columbus Didn't Discover Us: The Native People's Perspective on the Columbus Quincentennial; Adelante, Mujeres; and Images of Mexican Los Angeles. Antonio Rios-Bustamante, University of Arizona, will chair the session and join panelists Mike Fraga, Illinois Math and Science Academy, and Christine Marin, Arizona State University, in discussion of the films.

All members should have received by now their printed Program which contains the preregistration form for the meeting. The form should be returned to the headquarters office by December 10. Hotel reservation information appeared in the September issue of Perspectives (correct FAX number is (415) 227-2631). For copies or additional information, please write the Convention Manager at 400 A Street, SE, Washington, DC 20003.

Meeting attendees can obtain information on airfares from the AHA's official carrier, American Airlines, by calling American's Meeting Services Desk toll free at 1-800-433-1790 and ask for star-file number S0114BD. For reservations on U.S. Air, call the Meeting and Convention Desk at 1-800-334-8644 and ask for Gold File Number 89230032.