AHR Unbound: March 2021 Issue

Photograph of Rafael Serra courtesy of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Manuscripts, Archives and Rare Books Division, New York Public Library.

Due to production delays caused by the COVID-19 crisis, the American Historical Review’s March 2021 issue has been delayed both in-print and online. The June 2021 issue may be delayed as well. In order to make the content of the March issue available, we have decided to inaugurate a new feature, The AHR Unbound. Under normal circumstances, this would serve as a space for us to promote supplementary AHR material—everything from advance articles to additional illustrations, as well as thematic clusters of past and forthcoming content. In this case, we use the platform to disseminate the March articles and other featured content as advance articles.

Articles

“Befeathering the European: The Matter of Feathers in the Material Renaissance,” by Ulinka Rublack

“Rabbis of the (Scientific) Revolution: Revealing the Hidden Corpus of Early Modern Translations Produced by Jewish Religious Thinkers,” by Iris Idelson-Shein

“Mold’s Dominion: Science, Empire, and Capitalism in a Globalizing World,” by Gerard Sasges

“Cuban Racial Politics in Nineteenth-Century New York: A Critical Digital Approach,” by Jesse Hoffnung-Garskof

“Sounds of February, Smells of October: The Russian Revolution as Sensory Experience,” by Jan Plamper

History Unclassified

“Archiving the Chilean Revolution,” by José Ragas

“Deep Play? Video Games and the Historical Imaginary” by Andrew Denning

AHA Presidential Address

“Slow History,” by Mary Lindemann

AHR Review Roundtable

AHR Review Roundtable: The Wiley Blackwell History of Islam, by Hatsuki Aishima, Hayrettin Yücesoy, R. Michael Feener, Osamu Otsuka, Satoshi Ogura, Kenji Kuroda, and Hilary Kalmbach, with Armando Salvatore

Video Game Reviews

“Video Game Reviews: Introduction”

“Assassin’s Creed III. By Michael D. Hattem

“Assassin’s Creed IV: Black Flag. By Christopher P. Magra

“Assassin’s Creed: Freedom Cry. By Julien Bazile

Film Reviews

“Film Reviews: Introduction”

“Mike Leigh, director. Peterloo.” By James Epstein

“Kasi Lemmons, director. Harriet.” By Kellie Carter Jackson

“Ava Duvernay, director. When They See Us.” By Carl Suddler

“Renee Tajima-Peña, series producer. Asian Americans.” By William Gow

“Jeffrey Gould, director. Port Triumph.” By Aviva Chomsky

“Catherine Meyburgh and Richard Pakleppa, directors. Dying for Gold.” By Rosalind C. Morris

Featured Reviews

“Alexander Bevilacqua and Frederic Clark, editors. Thinking in the Past Tense: Eight Conversations.” By Surekha Davies

“Debjani Bhattacharyya. Empire and Ecology in the Bengal Delta: The Making of Calcutta; Sudipta Sen. Ganges: The Many Pasts of an Indian River; Sunil Amrith. Unruly Waters: How Rains, Rivers, Coasts, and Seas Have Shaped Asia’s History.” By Sujit Sivasundaram

“Maya K. Peterson. Pipe Dreams: Water and Empire in Central Asia’s Aral Sea Basin.” By Artemy M. Kalinovsky

“Jill E. Kelly. To Swim with Crocodiles: Land, Violence, and Belonging in South Africa, 1800–1996.” By Anne Mager

“Elizabeth A. Foster. African Catholic: Decolonization and the Transformation of the Church.” By Harry Gamble

“Tanya Sheehan. Study in Black and White: Photography, Race, Humor.” By Chris Dingwall

“Erika Lee. America for Americans: A History of Xenophobia in the United States.” By Kristofer Allerfeldt

“Pekka Hämäläinen. Lakota America: A New History of Indigenous Power.” By David W. Grua

“Olivier Wieviorka. The Resistance in Western Europe, 1940–1945.” By Megan Koreman

“Tamar Herzog. A Short History of European Law: The Last Two and a Half Millennia.” By Malick W. Ghachem

AHR Interview

For more episodes, check out AHR Interview on LibSyn.

AHA Members: To access the full text of articles, start at historians.org/myaha. Login with your email address and password. On the MY AHA page, scroll down in the white part of the page until you see the section AHA Publications on the left side. Click the link under that for American Historical Review at Oxford University Press. Next, click Continue to American Historical Review. On the Oxford site at https://academic.oup.com, you'll see AHA Member Access at the top right. As long as you see those words you're logged in and can access all versions of the AHR articles.