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  • Facing Slavery’s Legacy at Georgetown: What Can Historians Contribute?

    By Adam Rothman Many universities in the United States are reckoning with their own involvement in the history of American slavery. What can historians contribute? It may seem counterintuitive to ask what historians can bring to the discussion of what seems to be an essentially historical problem, but the answer is not obvious because it depends on the tricky relationship between the past and the present. Extract from Bill of Sale for 84 Slaves from Thomas Mulledy to Henry Johnson, November 29, 1838. The post Facing Slavery’s Legacy at Georgetown: What Can Historians Contribute? appeared first on American Historical Association.

  • The Politics of the Past in the Black Freedom Struggle

    “I grew up reading about you,” historian Clayborne Carson told Terrence Roberts, one of the nine Arkansas teenagers who faced down racist mobs to integrate Little Rock Central High School in 1957. The two sat beside each other onstage before a packed audience at the National Museum of the American Indian, there to witness the opening roundtable for “The Future of the African American Past”—a historic conference inaugurating the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of African American History and Culture, soon to open on the National Mall. The post The Politics of the Past in the Black Freedom Struggle appeared first on American Historical Association.

  • Grant of the Week: Forest History Society John M. Collier Award for Forest History Journalism

    Every week, AHA Today showcases a new grant, fellowship, or scholarship of interest to historians which has been posted to our free Calendar. This week we are featuring a prize from the Forest History Society. The Forest History Society annually confers the John M Collier Award for Forest History Journalism. The award recognizes the author of the best article on forest and conservation history published in newspapers, trade press, or general circulation magazines. An independent panel of judges considers depth of research, quality of analysis, clarity of expression, and overall significance when evaluating submissions. The post Grant of the Week: Forest History Society John M. Collier Award for Forest History Journalism appeared first on American Historical Association.

  • AHA Council, Divisions, and Committees for 2016 Added March 01, 2016

    AHA Actitivities

  • Seminar from the Institute for Constitutional History: Dissent and the Supreme Court

    The Institute for Constitutional History (ICH) is pleased to announce another seminar for advanced graduate students and junior faculty: Dissent and the Supreme Court. Instructor Melvin I. Urofsky is professor emeritus of history at Virginia Commonwealth University. He is the longtime editor of the Journal of Supreme Court History and has written widely on American constitutional development. His most recent books are the prize-winning Louis D. Brandeis: A Life (2009) and Dissent and the Supreme Court (2015). Program Content A dissent on the nation’s highest court may be no more than an angry reaction to the majority or frustration that the rest of the court does not share the dissenter’s views. The post Seminar from the Institute for Constitutional History: Dissent and the Supreme Court appeared first on American Historical Association.

  • Donate

    As the largest historical professional organization, the AHA has served as the primary voice for the discipline and for historians of all fields, time periods, and occupations.  Through our publications, annual meetings, projects, and other initiatives, the Association has supported the promotion of historical studies since 1884. Thanks to the generous support of our members and friends, the AHA has provided leadership for the discipline, protected academic freedom, developed professional standards, aided in the pursuit and publication of scholarship, and supplied various services to sustain and enhance the work of historians.  To support and strengthen our ongoing work on behalf of the discipline, we need your continued financial contributions. The American Historical Association is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization. All or part of your gift may be tax deductible as a charitable contribution.

  • Advocacy with the National Humanities Alliance

  • AHA Member Spotlight: Michael F. Magliari

    AHA members are involved in all fields of history, with wide-ranging specializations, interests, and areas of employment. To recognize our talented and eclectic membership, AHA Today features a regular AHA Member Spotlight series. Michael F. Magliari is a professor of history at California State University, Chico. He lives in Chico, California, and has been a member since 1990. Alma maters: PhD, University of California, Davis, 1992; MAT, University of California, Davis, 1982; BA, University of California, Davis, 1979 Fields of interest: agriculture, environment, labor, slavery and unfree labor systems, populism and socialism, American West, California, public history, historic preservation, and biography When did you first develop an interest in history? The post AHA Member Spotlight: Michael F. Magliari appeared first on American Historical Association.

  • Quantitative Literacy for Historians: Who’s Afraid of Numbers?

    By Nicholas Mulder and Madeline Woker This post marks the fourth in a series on what we’ve come to call the Career Diversity Five Skills—five things graduate students need to succeed as professors and in careers beyond the academy: Communication, in a variety of media and to a variety of audiences Collaboration, especially with people who might not share your worldview Quantitative literacy, a basic ability to understand and communicate information presented in quantitative form Intellectual self-confidence, the ability to work beyond subject matter expertise, to be nimble and imaginative in projects and plans Digital literacy, a basic familiarity with digital tools and platforms Numbers are everywhere. The post Quantitative Literacy for Historians: Who’s Afraid of Numbers? appeared first on American Historical Association.

  • Career Diversity Resources

    Are you a graduate student in history? Recently finished? Or even just considering enrolling in a history PhD program? The following resources are designed to help you think about the usefulness of historical training in a variety of career paths, no matter the stage of your graduate education.