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  • Information for Affiliates Added May 04, 2016

  • Communication: The Skill You’re Probably Taking for Granted Added May 04, 2016

    By Lindsey Martin This post marks the third in a series on what we’ve come to call the Career Diversity Five Skills—five things graduate students need to succeed as professors and in careers beyond the academy: Communication, in a variety of media and to a variety of audiences Collaboration, especially with people who might not share your worldview Quantitative literacy, a basic ability to understand and communicate information presented in quantitative form Intellectual self-confidence, the ability to work beyond subject matter expertise, to be nimble and imaginative in projects and plans Digital literacy, a basic familiarity with digital tools and platforms Graduate students in history should be encouraged to hone their communication skills for a range of audiences and media so they can develop the confidence to speak with whoever is on the other end of the line. The post Communication: The Skill You’re Probably Taking for Granted appeared first on American Historical Association.

  • Intellectual Self-Confidence Added May 04, 2016

  • Communication Added May 04, 2016

  • Jim Grossman Added May 04, 2016

    James Grossman is Executive Director of the American Historical Association. Formerly Vice President for Research and Education at the Newberry Library, he has taught at the University of Chicago and the University of California, San Diego. He is the author of Land of Hope: Chicago, Black Southerners, and the Great Migration and A Chance to Make Good: African-Americans, 1900-1929, and project director and coeditor of The Encyclopedia of Chicago (2005; online edition, 2006).

  • Seth Denbo Added May 04, 2016

    Seth oversees the publication department of the AHA and is primary staff for the Association's Research Division. He is working to develop innovative digital projects to enhance the organization’s mission. He earned his PhD from the University of Warwick and is a cultural historian of 18th-century Britain. He has taught British history in universities in both the United States and the United Kingdom. He has also worked on digital projects at Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities at UMD and the Department for Digital Humanities at King’s College London. Over the past 10 years, Seth has participated actively in the development of innovative digital tools and methods for historical scholarship. 

  • Stephanie Kingsley Added May 04, 2016

    Stephanie edits content for the AHA website and maintains the AHA's social media presence. Stephanie received her MA in English literature from the University of Virginia, where she specialized in American literature, textual studies, and book history. She plays the violin and occasionally writes on music history

  • Five Skills Added May 03, 2016

    The Career Diversity Five Skills were first identified in focus groups of historians with PhDs who found careers beyond traditional academia—five things they hadn’t learned in grad school but that they found they needed in order to succeed beyond the academy. These five skills are also essential to succeeding as professors. They are: COMMUNICATION, in a variety of media and to a variety of audiences COLLABORATION, especially with people who might not share your worldview QUANTITATIVE LITERACY: a basic ability to understand and communicate information presented in quantitative form, i.e., understanding that numbers tell a story the same way words, images, and artifacts do INTELLECTUAL SELF-CONFIDENCE: the ability to work beyond subject matter expertise, to be nimble and imaginative in projects and plans DIGITAL ENGAGEMENT: a thread that runs through the other four, but significant enough to merit its own emphasis This guide presents an introduction to each skill—adapted from posts originally published on AHA Today in Spring 2016—as well as a list of AHA-produced resources that can help develop an understanding of that skill. The resources include blog posts, Perspectives on History articles, video resources, and more. Many thanks to our blog authors for their thoughts and to Lindsey Martin, Mellon career development officer at the University of Chicago, who compiled and annotated these resources.

  • Submit a Proposal Added May 03, 2016

  • Committee on State Standards Added May 03, 2016