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  • Renaissance Society of America

  • News & Advocacy

    By providing leadership on current issues, highlighting the work of our members, and bringing the discipline into the public conversation, the American Historical Association is history's most influential and indispensable advocate. Our large membership enhances our influence in legislative and policy arenas, not just in Washington, but wherever we encounter issues regarding access to documents, academic freedom, discrimination, and other challenges affecting the work of historians. At a time of widespread budget cuts, AHA is one of the most important sources of advocacy, reminding policymakers of the importance of continuing to fund the institutions on which history in the United States depends.

  • The Changing Meanings of Marriage: Windsor in Historic Context Added July 01, 2013

    AHA Roundtable

  • Sixteen Months to Sumter

  • Teaching WWI History through Food Added January 01, 2015

  • Facing Slavery’s Legacy at Georgetown: What Can Historians Contribute?

    By Adam Rothman Many universities in the United States are reckoning with their own involvement in the history of American slavery. What can historians contribute? It may seem counterintuitive to ask what historians can bring to the discussion of what seems to be an essentially historical problem, but the answer is not obvious because it depends on the tricky relationship between the past and the present. Extract from Bill of Sale for 84 Slaves from Thomas Mulledy to Henry Johnson, November 29, 1838. The post Facing Slavery’s Legacy at Georgetown: What Can Historians Contribute? appeared first on American Historical Association.

  • The Politics of the Past in the Black Freedom Struggle

    “I grew up reading about you,” historian Clayborne Carson told Terrence Roberts, one of the nine Arkansas teenagers who faced down racist mobs to integrate Little Rock Central High School in 1957. The two sat beside each other onstage before a packed audience at the National Museum of the American Indian, there to witness the opening roundtable for “The Future of the African American Past”—a historic conference inaugurating the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of African American History and Culture, soon to open on the National Mall. The post The Politics of the Past in the Black Freedom Struggle appeared first on American Historical Association.

  • Grant of the Week: Forest History Society John M. Collier Award for Forest History Journalism

    Every week, AHA Today showcases a new grant, fellowship, or scholarship of interest to historians which has been posted to our free Calendar. This week we are featuring a prize from the Forest History Society. The Forest History Society annually confers the John M Collier Award for Forest History Journalism. The award recognizes the author of the best article on forest and conservation history published in newspapers, trade press, or general circulation magazines. An independent panel of judges considers depth of research, quality of analysis, clarity of expression, and overall significance when evaluating submissions. The post Grant of the Week: Forest History Society John M. Collier Award for Forest History Journalism appeared first on American Historical Association.

  • AHA Council, Divisions, and Committees for 2016 Added March 01, 2016

    AHA Actitivities

  • Seminar from the Institute for Constitutional History: Dissent and the Supreme Court

    The Institute for Constitutional History (ICH) is pleased to announce another seminar for advanced graduate students and junior faculty: Dissent and the Supreme Court. Instructor Melvin I. Urofsky is professor emeritus of history at Virginia Commonwealth University. He is the longtime editor of the Journal of Supreme Court History and has written widely on American constitutional development. His most recent books are the prize-winning Louis D. Brandeis: A Life (2009) and Dissent and the Supreme Court (2015). Program Content A dissent on the nation’s highest court may be no more than an angry reaction to the majority or frustration that the rest of the court does not share the dissenter’s views. The post Seminar from the Institute for Constitutional History: Dissent and the Supreme Court appeared first on American Historical Association.