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  • Grant of the Week: George E. Pozzetta Dissertation Award Added October 21, 2016

    Every week, AHA Today showcases a new grant, fellowship, or scholarship of interest to historians which has been posted to our free Calendar. This week we are featuring a dissertation award from the Immigration and Ethnic History Society. The Immigration and Ethnic History Society announces competition for the 2016 George E. Pozzetta Dissertation Award. It invites applications from any PhD candidate who will have completed qualifying exams by December 15, 2016, and whose thesis focuses on American immigration, emigration, or ethnic history. The post Grant of the Week: George E. Pozzetta Dissertation Award appeared first on American Historical Association.

  • The Liberal Dilemma: Can the New President Achieve Both Guns and Butter? Added October 24, 2016

    By Matthew Dallek “Wake up every one of you to the two fronts on which our defense must be built!” -Eleanor Roosevelt, 1940 As of this writing, according to the latest polls, Hillary Clinton is poised to become the next president of the United States. Amid the onslaught of news coverage given to Donald Trump’s presidential campaign, however, too little attention has been paid to the demands sure to face “a progressive who likes to get things done” (Clinton’s words) once she steps through the doors of the Oval Office in January. The post The Liberal Dilemma: Can the New President Achieve Both Guns and Butter? appeared first on American Historical Association.

  • Time to Right the Record: American Conservatism in the Archives Added October 14, 2016

    By Michelle Nickerson “We don’t have anything on conservative women, however . . .” This is what archivists would tell me during the earliest days of my dissertation research. It was the turn of the 21st century, and I was enthusiastically joining a wave of new scholars taking up what Alan Brinkley had called, in his path-breaking 1994 American Historical Review essay, “The Problem of American Conservatism.” US political historians, according to Brinkley, had failed to make legible the very successful decades-old movement of American conservatism—a problem he correctly attributed to a failure of “historical imagination” and “basic lack of sympathy for the Right among most scholars.” Unlike most other ABDs and newly minted PhDs working in the field though, I was not just interested in American conservatism; I was also interested in women and gender. The post Time to Right the Record: American Conservatism in the Archives appeared first on American Historical Association.

  • AHA Member Spotlight: Raphael Cassimere Jr. Added October 25, 2016

    Raphael Cassimere Jr. is the Seraphia D. Leyda University Professor emeritus at the University of New Orleans. He lives in New Orleans, Louisiana, and has been a member since 1977. Alma mater/s: BA, University of New Orleans, 1966; MA, University of New Orleans, 1968; PhD, Lehigh University, 1971 Fields of interest: African American, Louisiana, US constitutional Describe your career path. What led you to where you are today? I spent two years as a premed major, but always took a history course. The post AHA Member Spotlight: Raphael Cassimere Jr. appeared first on American Historical Association.

  • Alex Lichtenstein to Serve as Next Editor of the American Historical Review Added October 26, 2016

    The American Historical Association (AHA) has appointed Alex Lichtenstein as editor of the American Historical Review (AHR), beginning August 2017. “Professor Lichtenstein brings energy and insight to the editorial direction of the American Historical Review,” AHA president Pat Manning said of the appointment. “The AHA Council looks forward to working with him, the journal staff, and [the AHR editorial] board in charting the future of the premier historical journal.” Alex Lichtenstein Alex Lichtenstein is professor of history at Indiana University, where he teaches US and South African history. The post Alex Lichtenstein to Serve as Next Editor of the American Historical Review appeared first on American Historical Association.

  • Grant of the Week: Folger Shakespeare Library Long- and Short-term Fellowships, 2017–2018 Added October 27, 2016

    Every week, AHA Today showcases a new grant, fellowship, or scholarship of interest to historians which has been posted to our free Calendar. This week we are featuring long- and short-term fellowships from the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, DC. The Folger supports research on all aspects of British and European literary, cultural, political, religious, and social history from the 15th through the 18th centuries. The vaults house over 160,000 printed books, 60,000 manuscripts, and 90,000 prints, costumes, drawings, photographs, paintings, and other works of art. The post Grant of the Week: Folger Shakespeare Library Long- and Short-term Fellowships, 2017–2018 appeared first on American Historical Association.

  • Balancing Teaching and Scholarship: Why Two-Year Faculty Should Attend the AHA Annual Meeting Added October 20, 2016

    By Sarah Shurts I am always surprised that so many of my colleagues at two-year colleges don’t go to the AHA annual meeting. They all have high regard for the AHA itself and for its publications such as the American Historical Review. Many are even AHA members. But for various reasons they don’t think about attending the meeting or submitting a proposal. Some say it is because of the cost associated with travel, particularly if they have other conferences to attend. The post Balancing Teaching and Scholarship: Why Two-Year Faculty Should Attend the AHA Annual Meeting appeared first on American Historical Association.

  • AHA Member Spotlight: Heather Wacha Added November 02, 2016

    Heather Wacha is a CLIR Postdoctoral Fellow in Data Curation for Medieval Studies at the University of Wisconsin—Madison. She lives in Madison, Wisconsin, and has been a member since 2012. Websites: Incipio, Medieval Women and Manuscripts: Thinking Digital If Books Could Talk… Twitter handle: @hgwacha Alma maters: BA, Hamline University, 1985; PCGE, Birmingham Polytechnic (UK), 1991; MA, University of Iowa, 2009; PhD, University of Iowa, 2016 Fields of interest: medieval women’s and gender history, particularly Northern France (11th–13th centuries); paleography, historical bookbinding, paper-making, manuscript studies, and the history of the book in general; providing greater access and annotation of medieval documents through digital technologies Describe your career path. The post AHA Member Spotlight: Heather Wacha appeared first on American Historical Association.

  • Growing Pains and Growing Pleasures in Digital History: Announcing the November Issue of Perspectives Added November 04, 2016

    It’s fair to say that historians have assimilated the so-called digital turn in at least some aspects of their work. Many now know how to teach students the critical use of Wikipedia and no longer seek to ban it outright. Some who are fortunate enough to work at institutions with dedicated lab spaces have learned about digital tools available to them in teaching and research. At a minimum, most historians expect some primary sources relevant to their work to be available online. The post Growing Pains and Growing Pleasures in Digital History: Announcing the November Issue of Perspectives appeared first on American Historical Association.

  • Election Cake: A Forgotten Democratic Tradition Added November 01, 2016

    By Maia Surdam Most Americans today do not think about cake when considering this year’s election. But perhaps we should. Had we been colonists in New England or denizens of the new republic, cake would likely have been on our minds and in our bodies during election season. At our present moment, when political tensions run high and many Americans wait eagerly for the arrival of November 9, one might wonder why it’s worth thinking about cake and politics. Hartford Election Cakes were popular in Connecticut well into the 19th century, as this cookbook published in 1896 suggests. The post Election Cake: A Forgotten Democratic Tradition appeared first on American Historical Association.