2017 AHA Election: Committees

Committee on Committees

The Committee on Committees nominates individuals to fill vacancies on all regular Association committees. Returning members are Antoinette M. Burton, councilor, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (British empire, world) and Kaya ┼×ahin, Indiana Univ. (early modern Ottoman).

Slot 1

Christian Ayne Crouch

Bard College (New France, Atlantic world, indigenous studies, forms of colonial violence)

Website | Curriculum Vitae

Candidate Statement

As a historian of the early modern Atlantic, I explore questions of cross-cultural exchange, violence legitimating/contesting imperial expansion, and minority and indigenous rights. Working at a liberal arts college for a decade has afforded me great experience with interdisciplinarity, broadening the temporal and geographic scope of my research and teaching, and participation in civic engagement initiatives that make history accessible to communities beyond the academy, particularly those that are low-income and rural. I am committed to nurturing innovative research methods and inclusive hiring and pedagogical practices. I have applied these principles at my college, as a department chair, also serving on ten job searches in history/area studies/literature and, externally, in advisory positions at multiple early Atlantic-focused libraries and institutions. This broad exposure to fresh and established scholarship across numerous fields gives me a deep base from which to positively contribute to the purpose of the Committee on Committees.

Jennifer L. Palmer

University of Georgia (18th-century French slavery/race/gender)

Website | Curriculum Vitae

Candidate Statement

I situate my research in relation to many different histories: of gender, race, slavery, families, France, the Atlantic world, the law, colonialism, and empire. Engaging with multiple fields and themes within our discipline brings me into contact with many scholars whose work has enriched my own. As a past treasurer of the French Colonial Historical Society, I connected with scholars worldwide whose temporal interests ranged from the 15th through the 20th centuries, with geographic foci that spanned the Americas, the Caribbean, Africa, Asia, the Indian Ocean, and Europe. I believe deeply in the importance of scholarly exchange, and that through interaction we advance scholarship. Over the course of my career I have taught at a private secondary school, a community college, and a large research university. My familiarity with different research areas and academic modes will help me identify colleagues who will agree on outstanding historical scholarship and service.

Slot 2

Madeline Y. Hsu

University of Texas, Austin (migration and transnationalism, international, Asian American studies, modern China)

Website | Curriculum Vitae

Candidate Statement

In my two-decade academic career, I have provided leadership in several professional (IEHS, AAAS, ISSCO) and community organizations (Chinese Historical Society of America, Asian Family Social Services Agency, Wing Luke Museum) to bridge my research and teaching in Chinese migration and transnationalism with the broader responsibility of intellectuals to advance social justice and greater equity both on and beyond campuses for higher education. By working on behalf of the AHA and its membership, I hope to enhance accessibility of the resources concentrated on higher education institutions and strengthen relationships between academic programs and community, government, and public organizations with shared missions and values. My specialization in migration studies positions me to build bridges to ethnic and immigrant communities and further transnational partnerships among East Asian counterparts. These aspects of the AHA’s operations now require additional attention as conditions for international collaborations and migrant populations have become increasingly fraught.

Bryant Simon

Temple University (20th-century US, food studies, political economy)

Website | Curriculum Vitae

Candidate Statement

My research explores the intersection between popular culture and political economy in United States history. Recently, I have been involved in a program to globalize United States studies at my institution. This has led to the creation of transnational virtual classrooms and a series of student and faculty exchanges. But this project like so many others has been dogged by budget cuts. Nothing seems more essential at this uncertain juncture than to push back against austerity measures and make a case for historical thinking, research, and the careful assessment of sources as a central feature of any curriculum for higher education. In the past, I have served in leadership roles in other historical organizations. I am eager to use the contacts I have made to help identify colleagues who study a range of places and time periods, and work at diverse institutions and organizations, who can serve the AHA and make the case for the pressing need for history as a building block for learning and fostering a globally aware and engaged citizenry.

Nominating Committee

The Nominating Committee makes nominations for all elective posts in the AHA, oversees the counting of ballots, and reports the results of the election to the membership. Returning members are William Deverell, Univ. of Southern California (US West, environment); Purnima Dhavan, Univ. of Washington (Mughal literary cultures, early modern information networks); Laurent Dubois, Duke Univ. (Haitian revolution, Afro-Atlantic religion and cultural, Caribbean); Susannah R. Ottaway, Carleton Coll. (British social, European family); Kären E. Wigen, Stanford Univ. (historical geography of East Asia, early modernity in Japan); and Jamil S. Zainaldin, Georgia Humanities Council (law, philanthropy).

Slot 1

Tim Borstelmann

University of Nebraska, Lincoln (US international, 20th century)

Website | Curriculum Vitae

Candidate Statement

The work of the AHA Nominating Committee requires a capacious view of the historical profession, for which two aspects of my career have prepared me. One is employment. I spent several years as a western secondary school instructor, a dozen years in an Ivy League history department, and the last 14 years at a land-grant university in the Midwest. Such varied institutions have helped widen my vision of our discipline. The other is methodological. Trained primarily by social historians, writing mostly on US foreign relations, and now holding a chair in modern world history, I have learned with delight to connect with historians in all fields. Serving as president of the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations (SHAFR) and program chair for the Organization of American Historians (OAH) has further prepared me for the honor of working on the AHA Nominating Committee.

Kathleen Brosnan

University of Oklahoma (environmental, transnational history of wine)

Website | Curriculum Vitae

Candidate Statement

As a Nominating Committee candidate, I embrace the AHA’s commitment to diversity in the historical profession and its encouragement of institutions to recruit aggressively and hire members from groups that historically have faced discrimination. This principle must inform this committee’s work. To draw new scholars to our field, we must be more inclusive in identifying our leaders, compiling slates that foster diversity with regard to gender, race, ethnicity, national origin, physical abilities, sexual orientation, and religion. Given the wide range of employment historians enjoy, the committee should recruit candidates who work in community colleges and liberal arts colleges as well as research universities, and scholars who work outside the academy. The slate should recognize regional variation and a variety of subfields. These goals defined my efforts as ASEH president and as an associate dean, as well as in other professional service. I am honored to have a chance to serve the AHA.

Slot 2

Lyman L. Johnson

Univ. of North Carolina, Charlotte (late colonial Río de la Plata and Atlantic)

Website | Curriculum Vitae

Candidate Statement

Like most AHA members, my professional life developed in a complex of related venues. I am a historian of colonial Latin America and my experience as a researcher and scholarly author has provided me with great satisfaction. I have also loved teaching and am one of only two professors at my institution to receive both the campus-wide teaching and research awards. Because I was the only Latin American historian at my university for 25 years of my 41-year career (there are now four), the AHA was crucial to my development as a scholar and teacher, facilitating the growth of professional contacts and providing a forum for my scholarship. I am very grateful to the AHA for this support and I am committed doing what I can to strengthen this crucial organization at a moment when the foundations of American intellectual life are threatened directly. If elected, I commit to doing what I can to see that our organization’s governance structure mirror the rich diversity of our membership.

Gabriel Paquette

Johns Hopkins University (Spain and Portugal and their colonies, comparative imperial)

Website | Curriculum Vitae

Candidate Statement

I am committed to helping to further internationalize the AHA, making connections and formalizing relationships with non-US scholarly associations and groups. I believe that US-based historians stand to benefit from the deepening of such links, both professionally and intellectually. I am committed to making the AHA even more hospitable and accessible to graduate students, early career postdoctoral scholars, and non-tenure-track faculty. In a professional environment marked by precarious funding and university retrenchment, it is crucial to work to remove barriers to full participation in the life of the AHA for all of its members. I am committed to identifying ways for the AHA to support specialist journals and smaller academic publishers that are under duress in an age of paywalls, budget cuts, and all-to-frequent mergers. Only with a rich and diverse ecosystem of journals and monograph publishing can the profession, and all of its subfields, flourish.

Slot 3

Carin Berkowitz

Chemical Heritage Foundation (modern British and American medical sciences and visual culture)

Website | Curriculum Vitae

Candidate Statement

My role as a community builder in a research library necessitates that I think about the ways historical skills and practices cut across the boundaries of academic and nonacademic worlds, across school and rank, and unite us all. As a member of the Nominating Committee, I hope to contribute to the broader community of historians and to the AHA, which advocates for them in a changing academic landscape. I will bring to the position a familiarity with a variety of institutions both within and outside the academy and a focus on ensuring that the diversity of the AHA’s membership with respect to career stage, background, subdiscipline, and institution is represented among the leadership of the AHA. The futures of the humanities, of tenure, of adjuncting and career diversity, and of curriculum development at all educational levels are uncertain; the AHA gives voice to the profession as those futures are decided.

Malcolm Richardson

independent scholar, NEH retired (US philanthropy, 20th-century Europe)

Website | Curriculum Vitae

Candidate Statement

After completing my PhD in European history at Duke University, a series of adjunct appointments left me looking for an alternative to the traditional career in teaching. I have spent virtually all my professional life outside the university in a variety of leadership positions at the National Endowment for the Humanities, the President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities, the White House Millennium Council, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. I still managed to find time for research, and my publications have been primarily in the history of American philanthropy and support for the arts and humanities. My experience leads me to believe we will benefit by encouraging historians from a variety of professional backgrounds to play an active role in the work of the association. I welcome the opportunity to help identify colleagues with diverse scholarly interests, careers, and viewpoints.