122nd Annual Meeting

Highlights of the 122nd Annual Meeting

Sharon K. Tune, November 2007

The 122nd Annual Meeting of the American Historical Association will be held January 3–6, 2008, in Washington, D.C., at the Marriott Wardman Park, the Omni Shoreham, and the Hilton Washington. More than 1,700 scholars, including 175 from 28 countries, will participate in 345 AHA and affiliate sessions. Fifty-four specialized affiliated societies and other groups will cosponsor sessions or hold separate luncheons, sessions, and meetings. AHA and affiliate events are summarized in the front portion of the Program (which was mailed to members in late-October), beginning on page 29 with details of sessions listed in the main body of the program. AHA-sponsored sessions begin on page 85 with affiliated society sessions following in alphabetical order in each time period. A searchable, online version of the program is available at www.historians.org/annual/program.cfm.

Noted below are sessions and events sponsored by Association divisions and committees. Session numbers are indicated in parentheses.

The Teaching Division

The AHA's Teaching Division is sponsoring several roundtables and sessions: "Closing the ‘Passion Gap' in Graduate Education: Strategies for Building Graduate Community and Sustaining the Joy of Doing History" (61) with the AHA Professional Division and the AHA Committee for Graduate Students; "Sites for Encounter and Cultural Production: Teaching and Researching World History in K–16" (91) with the AHA's Research Division; "Teaching by Having Students Think Historically" (92 and 154), a two-part session with the Society for History Education; "Connections: Collaborative Efforts between K–12 History Teachers and Post-Secondary History Teachers" (124); "Learning to Teach: History Education for the Twenty-First Century" (125) with the AHA's Committee for Graduate Students; and "Three Public Historians Discuss Their Work" (152).

The division is also sponsoring four sessions with the College Board: "The Environment, Gender, and Cultural Hierarchy: Analytic Approaches to Uneven Development in World History" (25); "Emancipation, Civil War, and Civil Rights: The Struggle for African American Rights" (48); "Teaching Social and Economic Reform in U.S. History Survey Courses: High School and College Perspectives" (107) with the Society for Historians of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era; and "Religion in the History Survey: A Transhistorical Discussion" (234).

The division will cosponsor the Advanced Placement luncheon on Saturday, January 5 with the College Board and the World History Association. David Armitage (Harvard Univ.) will speak on "The Declaration of Independence and Its Global Impact." Allison Clark, director, history curriculum and content development, College Board, will preside.

The Teaching Division is also sponsoring—with the Research Division and the National Endowment for the Humanities—an all-day pre-meeting workshop on Thursday, January 3, on the "Intersection between Teaching and Research in the New Media." See online versoin of the 2008 Annual Meeting Program for complete details of the four sessions and speakers.

The Professional Division

For the 18th year, the AHA's Professional Division continues its sponsorship of a workshop on "Interviewing in the Job Market in the Twenty-First Century" (27) in conjunction with the Coordinating Council for Women in History and the AHA Committee for Graduate Students, on Friday, January 4, from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Session attendees will be divided into small interviewee groups, each led by a faculty member or a public historian who will conduct mock interviews and lead discussion of successful interview strategies. Anthony T. Grafton (Princeton Univ.), vice president of the Professional Division, will preside.

The division is also sponsoring one session, three roundtables, two open forums, and an experimental session. These include "Closing the ‘Passion Gap' in Graduate Education: Strategies for Building Graduate Community and Sustaining the Joy of Doing History" (61) with the AHA Teaching Division and the AHA Committee for Graduate Students; "Lives in History" (88); "Public History, Tenure, and Review: Continuing the Conversation about Redefining Historical Scholarship" (89); "Equity for Minority Historians in the Academic History Workplace: A Guide to Best Practices" (148) with the AHA Committee on Minority Historians; and "From Teaching Assistant to Tenure: The Transition from Graduate Student to Professional" (149) with the AHA Committee for Graduate Students.

The division will sponsor an open forum on disability following the Friday, January 4 afternoon sessions, beginning at 4:45 p.m. Anthony Grafton and members of the division will host the open forum to discuss professional issues relating to disability. All attendees are welcome to attend.

In the Saturday midday time period, two members of the division—Spencer Crew (National Underground Railroad Freedom Center/George Mason Univ.) and Art Gomez (National Park Service) will lead a forum for public historians (121) to discuss issues of interest. That evening, the division will co-host a reception for public historians and anyone with an interest in public history, with the American Association for State and Local History, the National Museum of American History, the National Council on Public History, and the Society for History in the Federal Government.

The Research Division

The AHA's Research Division will sponsor an experimental session, a multisession workshop, and several sessions and roundtables. Sessions include "Best-Selling Historical Fiction and Younger Audiences" (32); "European Women's History: Past, Present, and Future" (90); "Sites for Encounter and Cultural Production: Teaching and Researching World History in K–16" (91) with the Teaching Division; "Counting History among the Humanities: The Indicators Project and the Profession" (122); "From Notes to Narrative: The Art of Crafting a Dissertation or Monograph" (123) with the AHA Committee for Graduate Students; "Medieval History: Old and New Classics II" (150); "Borderlands and Encounters: The Problem Revisited" (151); "New World of Publishing: Intellectual Property, Journals, and the Web" (179) with the Coordinating Council for Women in History; and "Film History and Film Studies: Sources, Methodologies, Approaches" (210). With the National Endowment for the Humanities the division will sponsor an experimental session on "Tech Tools for Historians" (31).

The Research Division and the American Academy of Research Historians of Medieval Spain will sponsor a multisession workshop on "Late Medieval and Early Modern Spain: Social Developments in Early Modern Castile" (30) and "The World of Politics" (62). The participation of Spanish scholars on these sessions is made possible through a subsidy from the Program for Cultural Cooperation between Spain's Ministry of Culture and U.S. Universities.

The Committee on Minority Historians

The Committee on Minority Historians will cosponsor the sessions "Rethinking ‘Race' in U.S. Relations with Asia, 1945–80" (2) and "Equity for Minority Historians in the Academic History Workplace: A Guide to Best Practices" (148) with the AHA Professional Division.

The CMH invites minority graduate students and first-year faculty to a complimentary continental breakfast on Friday, January 4, from 7:30 to 9:00 a.m. to discuss life in the profession. If interested in attending, e-mail Cliff Jacobs at cjacobs@historians.org to register by December 10. Individuals who wish to participate in the discussion only are invited to arrive at 8:15 a.m. The CMH also invites minority scholars, graduate students, and others attending the Annual Meeting to a reception on Saturday, January 5, beginning at 6:00 p.m.

The Committee on Women Historians

The Committee on Women Historians is sponsoring the roundtable "Women's and Gender History in a Global Perspective" (153) and the session "The Leaky Pipeline: Issues of Retention, Promotion, and Quality of Life for Women in the Historical Profession" (211). The CWH also invites attendees to its annual breakfast on Saturday morning, January 5. Barbara Ransby (Univ. of Illinois at Chicago) will preside and Lisa Yun Lee (director, Hull-House Museum) will speak. Preregistration is required; see the AHA registration form in this issue or on the AHA's web site (www.historirans.org/annual/registration.htm).

The Committee for Graduate Students

The Committee for Graduate Students (CGS) is sponsoring a workshop and five roundtables: "Interviewing in the Job Market in the Twenty-First Century" (27) with the Professional Division and the Coordinating Council for Women in History; "Closing the ‘Passion Gap' in Graduate Education: Strategies for Building Graduate Community and Sustaining the Joy of Doing History" (61) with the Professional Division and the Teaching Division; "An Insider's Guide to the Academic Job Market" (93); "From Notes to Narrative: The Art of Crafting a Dissertation or Monograph" (123) with the Research Division; "Learning to Teach: History Education for the Twenty-First Century" (125) with the Teaching Division; and "From Teaching Assistant to Tenure: The Transition from Graduate Student to Professional" (149) with the Professional Division.

On Friday, January 5, beginning at 5:30 p.m., the CGS will sponsor an open forum to discuss issues of interest to graduate students. Immediately following the forum, all graduate students are invited to attend a reception in their honor beginning at 6:30 p.m. See the online version of the 2008 Annual Meeting Program for additional events of special interest to graduate students.

—Sharon K. Tune is the AHA convention director.