For the Writer

Opening Your Program. Whatever formula is decided on, the way you open a program is always critical. Of course, openings are generally written, at least in part. Effective openings may range from appropriate sound effects to a simple question that hits home. Dramatized openings, depicting the issue in human terms; news openings, bringing developments on the issue up to the minute; statements by the speakers, suggesting their points of view; or the introduction of a popular guest with name value to state the question and kick off the discussion, are all ways of starting the G.I. Radio Roundtable.

Here are some sample openings:

Opening No. 1 (Fade in ad lib discussion and hold approximately to seconds, or just long enough to allow a complete idea to be expressed, then fade under at cue from producer.)

Announcer: What do you think about this idea that (Recapitulate idea just expressed)? It’s an issue you talk about every day. It’s one of your problems, as a soldier and a citizen, and you’re wise to be thinking about it before you get back to the U. S. A., and can help do something about it. If you think it out now, then you’ll know better where you stand. The subject, as you’ve guessed, is (state topic). Your speakers are Pvt. Joe Smith, Infantryman, who (tell briefly as much as can be permitted about Smith, and about the others on the program). Now let’s get back to our radio roundtable.

Speakers: Discussion (fade in discussion)

Opening No. 2 (Example of news item opening)

Announcer: November 27. Senator ________ of ________ speaking in Washington on the role of the United States in maintaining world peace after this war, warned that (continue with news item). How do you feel about this problem of keeping the peace? How can we organize for world peace? The G.I. Radio Roundtable brings you today three authorities: Cpl. Ralph Meadows, Infantry, formerly a lawyer, graduate of Harvard Law School; Pfc. Austin Myers, Artillery, who graduated from the University of Michigan, in Political Science; and Sgt. Bill Born, who was on the police force in Omaha, Nebraska. They’re going to discuss this issue, which is getting closer to all of us every day. So think it over with us on the G.I. Radio Roundtable ...

Speakers: (Bring in each speaker in turn with brief speech to reveal point of view and identify voice. Continue discussion.)

Closing your program is an easier matter than opening it. Here is one way of doing it:

Closing

Announcer: Guess we didn’t settle the question of ___________ (restate topic), but that’s not exactly the purpose of a G.I. Radio Roundtable. You can’t tie up the world’s problems in a bundle in 29 minutes and 30 seconds, but you can get to thinking about them more clearly, get some more facts, and test your ideas against the other fellow’s in a democratic way. Many of you will want to dig deeper into this problem. So go over to _____________, where you’ll find some more dope—articles, charts, and so on. And be sure to be around for another G.I. Radio Roundtable next __________ at _________ on the subject of _________.